Tips and techniques by pro angler Lee Bailey jr

An excellent collection of fishing tips, fishing tactics, and fishing tricks for bass, by Lee Bailey Jr

 

 

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The Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass Fishing in the North

May 4, 2021 by lbailey

Typically Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass Fishing in the North is when you should think of post spawn bass. Think of big groups of bass looking for a summer hang out spot. Most bass only spawn for a couple of days before they head on back to the deeper creek channels and main river channels to group up and feed on shad for the summer. I try to target places that are fairly deep water and with a little cover. For deeper lakes I tend to look for longer points that might extend for a couple of hundred feet. I want to find numbers of fish because they will likely be more active and feeding rather than trying to locate one or two fish up shallow.

Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass

Typically Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass Fishing in the North is when I think of post spawn bass I think of big groups of bass looking for a summer hang out spot. Most bass only spawn for a couple of days before they head on back to the deeper creek channels and main river channels to group up and feed on shad for the summer. I try to target places that are fairly deep water and with a little cover. For deeper lakes I tend to look for longer points that might extend for a couple of hundred feet. I want to find numbers of fish because they will likely be more active and feeding rather than trying to locate one or two fish up shallow.

The post-spawn bass fishing season in the North typically begins when the water temperature reaches 70 degrees. It also coincides when the bluegill begin spawning. On most years, the spawn lasts only 2-3 weeks. If the spring is cold, it might be less than that. The post-spawn period is normally just two or three weeks as well, and then they begin establishing summer patterns.

A Binsky by Fish Sense Lures worked around these weed beds to mimic a vulnerable bluegill is another effective strategy for post-spawn. The Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass are positioned perfectly for this technique as well. Match the Binsky to the colors of the bluegill. Then look for a reaction bite. The size of fish you catch will tell you which presentation to use.

Because the bluegill are often spawning, seek out Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass by finding the bluegill. Look for the closest deep water structure near bluegill beds. Often times you can find this happening in the same places you caught spawning bass, because bluegill will often spawn in the same area. Bluegill and bass have an interesting relationship. During the bass spawn, bluegill will often pester bass by raiding their nest and eat their eggs. However, when the bass are done spawning, they will turn around and ambush the bluegill beds for their own food source, and eat the bluegills.

Fishing the Binsky is a great way to get a bite on a super slow day. When the day hits that lull where fish become less active and the bite has slowed down, the Binsky Late/Spring Early/Summer Bass are perfectly set up to get a bite. There are two ways I like to fish the Binsky Blade Bait, and the first way is fishing across a point. Position yourself where you can cast across the point and hop and drag the bottom all the way back to the boat.

The other way is to fish it, is to parallel the channel or structure. Try to keep your Binsky Blade Bait as close to the fish as possible allowing the slow sinking of the bait to attract the fish off the structure.

Deep blading is a tournament proven way to catch fish. Every pro on the tour will throw a blade bait at some point during the late spring early summer events they fish. Fish are feeding on shad and a Binsky will get a reaction strike every time, so fish that are pressured or hugging the bottom will bite a Binsky Blade Bait that comes by their face. When cranking a blade you want to identify the water depth and water clarity.

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